First oil change on my C650GT

EvilTwin

Active member
Bike has about 750 miles on it, and service was on in the display. First oil change is 650Miles IIRC, so I had gotten the oil and filter in advance. I also had one of the plastic adapters to spin off the oil filter. I had the pages for the oil change from the service manual printed out to follow along with as well.

I've done plenty of oil changes over the years on all sorts of machinery, but this one was not the most tech friendly design. The drain plug had some black fillings on it but nothing terrible. Oil still looked clean. The oil filter was on so tight that it spun the 3/8 recess for the wrench. I ended up taking it off with an adjustable oil filter wrench that bites into the housing. It was very tight even with that wrench, but it came off. The little mesh strainer came out and went back in easy enough, maybe on sliver inside of that. All the work was done on the floor, would have been much easier on a lift. I can see it taking about an hour or so on the next go around.
 

pneuby

Member
Bro, you make it sound as though I could even do it.
On a 'first' service like that, I'd want a tech going over the nuts, bolts, cables, hoses, etc
Checking torque specs, and such like that to be safe....but that's me.
 

EvilTwin

Active member
I've found that most of the routine stuff that people bring in for service can be done DIY if you have the patience and reasonable skills. I've been messing around with fixing things since I was a teenager including cars and boats and lately bikes. Even professional mechanics had to start somewhere and most likely when they did start out, they are the ones doing the oil changes. So if you bring the bike in for something like that, most likely its the most junior guy that will get the assignment.

I've had a couple of Mercedes cars and I did all the routine maintenance on those as well. And truthfully I found them to be pretty well designed for service, unlike some American made vehicles that don't seem to take that into account.

Can anybody do their own service? Maybe, if you have a mind to do it and dont mind some greasy hands. Am I worried about loose nuts and bolts? Not really, the bike only has about 750 miles on it. Now I do need to figure out where the odb2 connector is so I can see about resetting the service reminder.
 

Don

New member
Now I do need to figure out where the odb2 connector is so I can see about resetting the service reminder.

Page 114 of the rider's manual shows the location of the "Data Link Connecter" which I assume to be the ODB2 connector.
 
after oil change you must do service reset process. you need to connect the motoscan app trough the obd2 device plug into the obd2 port located removing the right front panel, and make the reset. if the electrical reset process is missing, you will continue having the computers warning signals on, in the motorcycle display forever. regards,
 

EvilTwin

Active member
I finally found my odb2 adapter. Sometimes I'm too smart/dumb/forgetful for myself. I had squirreled it away in a tool roll that I had on the other bike and moved to this one when I got it. I have the motoscan app on my phone and once I figured out which version of the bike to use (there are 2 for the K19) then I was able to get into the instrument cluster and the service reset lives in there. I kept clicking on the reset buttons and the software responded but nothing seemed to happen, so I shut the bike off and turned it back on and service was now off.

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moodleman

Member
I finally found my odb2 adapter. Sometimes I'm too smart/dumb/forgetful for myself. I had squirreled it away in a tool roll that I had on the other bike and moved to this one when I got it. I have the motoscan app on my phone and once I figured out which version of the bike to use (there are 2 for the K19) then I was able to get into the instrument cluster and the service reset lives in there. I kept clicking on the reset buttons and the software responded but nothing seemed to happen, so I shut the bike off and turned it back on and service was now off.

73np8ob.jpg


ZFQ35BY.jpg
So - the OBD (Data Link) connector - that's not the green bit, or is it. I am guessing the data link connector is the black bit that the green bit is plugged into, and the green bit is a bluetooth adaptor? If I want to use an OBD do I need a scanner, or just the adaptor and the Motoscan app on my phone does the scanning? (I just don't understand these things - yet!)
 

Delray

Well-known member
"Even professional mechanics had to start somewhere and most likely when they did start out, they are the ones doing the oil changes. So if you bring the bike in for something like that, most likely its the most junior guy that will get the assignment."

This is so true. I am far from being a professional mechanic, but NOBODY is going to give my oil change more TLC than me. I take my time. I do it right.

And then there's the significant money savings.

I got my first maxi-scooter on Christmas Eve, 2016. With little mechanical experience, I relied on a dealership for maintenance work. After a $538 belt change on a Honda Silver Wing, I resolved to teach myself. Watched tons of YouTube vids. Got the right tools. Bought the service manual. Dug deep in these forums. Compiled notes and tips and specs and torques.

On April 16th, I bought a 2013 BMW C 650 GT with 15,100 miles. Within three weeks, I replaced the CVT belt and rollers, changed the oil and filter, put in new spark plugs, coolant, air filter and two CVT filters, new brake pads and brake fluid, replaced the battery and swapped out an aftermarket exhaust that came with the bike for the original. That's easily $2,000 to $2,500 worth of work at a BMW dealership.

My total cost for parts, tools and fluids was $470. And I know every job was done carefully. Every bolt was torqued to spec.

This is not rocket science. It's routine maintenance work that, as the OP stated, junior guys at a dealership usually handle. Point is, you CAN do this work. You just gotta wanna.
 
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moodleman

Member
So true, Delray. I was a farmer for 40 years, and very familiar with all kinds of mechanical things. But when I got my first maxi scooter (Yamaha T-Max) I was a bit frightened of its complexity, and the dealer did all the work on it for me. Expensive. Then I got a Burgman 650 - more complex than the T-Max, and much more difficult to work on. But after a couple of dreadful bills for what I had thought would be routine stuff - I started using the BurgmanUSA forum and taught myself how to do it all. Now I am about to take delivery of a BMW C650 and I guess I'll have to start learning it all again!
The mechanics at the dealers' workshops sure don't have any magic powers in their hands that I don't have....
 

Delray

Well-known member
"Then I got a Burgman 650 ... Now I am about to take delivery of a BMW C650 and I guess I'll have to start learning it all again!"

Good news for you, budding BMW owner. Working on the GT is waaaaaaaaaay easier. I sold my third Burgman 650 for my third BMW GT and I'm never looking back. One of the big reasons was ease of maintenance (the other was the Burgman's bathtub-on-wheels handling at low speed; the BMW can literally ride circles around it).

Taking off the plastic is easier. Slip off the black gas cap cover, remove two screws on the center cover tupperware and work downhill from there.

Don't know if you ever tackled the knuckle-blood-fest that is a Burgman spark plug change, but with the BMW, you loosen several bolts to lower the radiator and voila, the ignition coils are wide open (if you happen to have a 14 mm spark plug socket for a Prius you will be very happy).

Oil change? Every 6,000 miles for the BMW vs. 3,500 for the Burgman.

Battery change? Four screws remove the upper fairing on the BMW; you can sit in a chair and work on the battery. With the Burgman, put on your spelunking cap and get ready for a mining expedition under the seat.

Need to take off the rear tire? It's a five-minute job on the BMW.

The fitment of the C 650 GT is phenomenal. I think you will really like it.

Only gripe I have is the service manual is only on DVD and only works on a Windows PC. That meant my iPhone 11 and iMac desktop and Macbook laptop were all useless. But, hey, when life gives you lemons, I bought an old Dell laptop for $80 and keep it in the garage to run the DVD and stream music.

Congrats on the new purchase. Smart move. Year and color?
 
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Delray

Well-known member
"I guess I'll have to start learning it all again!"

FYI, BMW is all about the torx ... these six work with every bolt I've encountered on the bike ....

T-25
T-27
T-30
T-45
T-50 (rear wheel)
T-55

The big hex is for the front axle, 19 mm.

The t-handle is a T-30, the most common bolt on the bike. This tool is necessary for changing the belt.
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moodleman

Member
Thanks Delray - most encouraging! My new (secondhand) bike arrives on Monday, freighted from a dealer 1,000km away. I have not actually seen the bike yet, but it has 11,000km on the clock (about 6,800 miles) and the dealer assures me (!!!) that it is in "fantastic" condition. And it certainly looks immaculate in all the pics I have seen. Here's hoping it is not equipped with 2 bald tyres and a flat battery ...

I did a lot of the maintenance on the Burgy, but you are right, getting to the bloody plugs was a major effort, not to mention the battery, in fact everything was difficult. Getting a back tyre off was about an hour's worth. I just used to marvel at how much stuff had been fitted so tightly under all those fairings.

Now to sell the Burgy. Monday will be a very exciting day!
 

Ceesie76

Active member
So - the OBD (Data Link) connector - that's not the green bit, or is it. I am guessing the data link connector is the black bit that the green bit is plugged into, and the green bit is a bluetooth adaptor? If I want to use an OBD do I need a scanner, or just the adaptor and the Motoscan app on my phone does the scanning? (I just don't understand these things - yet!)
The black plug is BMW's connector. The green thing plugged into it is a universal bluetooth 'dongle' that allows your phone/tablet with the motoscan app to communicate with the ECU. So you need both the dongle and the app, BMW supplies the plug and ECU.
The dongle you can also use on other OBD2 equipped machines, like any modern car, to read and clear codes, program features, reset service reminders etc so it can be useful separate from the bike.
 

EvilTwin

Active member
Thanks Ceesie76, perfectly clear now.
I didn't catch what year your bike is, but the earlier models were a bit different in that they used a round data port instead of a standard ODB2 connector. Not a big deal as you can get the adapter off Amazon for less than 20 bucks. My R12RT used the round port and this same setup worked with that bike before I got the C650.

The Green dohicky is the actual bluetooth ODB2 adapter. Probably the most expensive part of the project at around 50 dollars. You have to get one of the adapters that motoscan recommends or it probably wont work with their app. There are lots of these adapters around for much less, and they work with apps like Torque for your car, but this software won't recognize them.
 

moodleman

Member
Thanks EvilTwin, I think my bike will have the standard plug, it is a 2019 model (not sure, still waiting for final delivery this morning!). The green LX adapter is indeed available from Amazon - for $124. Australia is an expensive place to live! (The oblong-to-round adaptor cable is about $30 here).
 

slant911

Active member
Thanks EvilTwin, I think my bike will have the standard plug, it is a 2019 model (not sure, still waiting for final delivery this morning!). The green LX adapter is indeed available from Amazon - for $124. Australia is an expensive place to live! (The oblong-to-round adaptor cable is about $30 here).
This one is $124 there? Ouch...
 

Topefisher

New member
"Then I got a Burgman 650 ... Now I am about to take delivery of a BMW C650 and I guess I'll have to start learning it all again!"

Only gripe I have is the service manual is only on DVD and only works on a Windows PC. That meant my iPhone 11 and iMac desktop and Macbook laptop were all useless. But, hey, when life gives you lemons, I bought an old Dell laptop for $80 and keep it in the garage to run the DVD and stream music.

You should be able to copy your DVD to your hard drive As I have ( Windows 10 ) using shortcut on your Desktop so dont need to run the DVD each time
Like you i have the Iphone 11, but the motoscan is Android based so cannot use it. I have and old Samsung but the software is too out of date for it. Its not good for the low Ram in my laptop either so using motoscan is work in progress at the moment.
 

moodleman

Member
This one is $124 there? Ouch...
Yes, Amazon now has an Australian presence, so will not ship from US to Australia if the item is available from their Australian outlet. And that little bit of commercial bastardry results in much higher prices here in Aust.
 
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