Just hit 20,000 miles on my C650 GT

Delray

Active member
This is my third BMW C650 GT. It's a 2013 model that arrived safely at 20,000 miles this morning. Previously, I owned a white 2016 and a black 2017.

Also previously owned four Honda Silver Wing 600's and three Suzuki Burgman 650's, all since Christmas Eve 2016 when I bought my first maxi-scooter. The fact that I ended up staying with the BMW tells you which one I think is best (by far).

Most of the other bikes were low mileage. I'd search out great deals on scooters that sat in garages for a long time, buy them and update all the maintenance, then enjoy them for awhile and sell for a break-even price or modest profit. There are LOTS of riders out there who don't do their own maintenance and are happy to pay a little more for a shiny clean, fully updated bike.

My current GT came with 15,100 miles. It was a trade-in at a Ducati dealership that didn't know what to do with it, so they sold it to me for $3900. I added $500 for parts to update it. I installed a Mitsuboshi drive belt using a BMW variator holder, turned off the service alert with MotoScan software, updated the fluids with Motul oil and BMW filter, new BMW coolant and brake fluid, then added a #2 chain rail due at 15k miles, new Denso spark plugs and new air and CVT filters (two CVT's). I bought it with an aftermarket GPR muffler installed, but lucky for me, the dealer had the OEM muffler and I put that back on.

Only issue I had was a failing rear TPMS sensor. I bought a Chinese replacement for $20 vs. the BMW dealer's $300 estimate and paid a local bike shop $20 to open up the tire and screw in the new sensor. After doing maintenance on seven Silver Wings and Burgmans, I can say BMW is the easiest to work on (by far). The service manual, although it's a PITA because it only runs on DVD on a Windows PC and I'm an Apple guy, is far clearer and more comprehensive than the other manuals.

This has been a FANTASTIC ride. It just goes and goes and goes. I looked at a Kymco AK 550 last week, in part because there's a Kymco dealer 0.6 miles from my front door. It's a smart bike for the left brain (logic). It makes sense. Nimble, quick, fun, ABS and TPMS, 15" wheels, bluetooth dashboard screen, easy to download free service manual. But in the end, it didn't engage my right brain (emotion). I just felt ... meh, it's a Kymco. The BMW still excites me.

I'm eager to see how far this one goes, and if I learn tomorrow that it needs major repair, I would be happy to sell it and buy a 2016+ model (Gen 1.0 models up to 2015 are slower off the line). Happy Trails!

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SJMike

New member
Yo !
I just hit 18,000 miles . Bought my 2015 model on Oct 3rd 2020 with 9,900 miles on the scooter. Rode it from San Jose , CA to Tijuana , Mexico & back over 3 days in May 2021. You need to run some real miles on the BMW & see what it can do. So far I've put on 8100 mile in less than a year & it's not even Oct. 2021 yet.
I guess it shows how the BMW can be dependable over long rides. I usually commute on it to work most days here in sunny Calif. It's great riding home in the Diamond - car pool lane while all the cars stack up next to me.
I plan to ride my C650GT into the ground . Hoping to get 50 - 60K miles before I give it up

Anyone out there planning ride their BMW long term ?

Stay safe & watch out for those crazy distracted car drivers
 

Delray

Active member
"Hoping to get 50 - 60K miles before I give it up"

I have seen a few riders on this forum with 60k miles on their odometers. I like that. It could mean my GT is just getting warmed up at 20,000 miles.

"You need to run some real miles on the BMW & see what it can do."

Before COVID reared its ugly head, I sold my practical Prius and bought a big, red Ford F-250 truck, circa 2002 in pristine condition with 98k miles on a V-10 Triton engine. It was a puppy. My plan was to tow a toy hauler RV around the country with the BMW inside. That way, when I reached a new destination, I'd be eager to ride the bike and explore, versus 6 or 8 hours in the saddle to reach that new destination and riding would be the last thing I'd want to do. I also liked the idea of having two vehicles at my disposal in case one broke down 2,000 miles from home.

I'm not fond of long days in the saddle. I've had Corbin seats on several maxi-scooters. They make long rides a LOT more comfortable.
 
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Delray, I envy how hands-on you've been able to get with your GT. You know how well everything's behaving, because you've turned each nut or replaced each consumable with your own ten digits.

Sadly, NYC apartment living keeps me on the mechanic's leash despite my desire to get more grease under my nails -- the best I manage most times is to identify opportunities to save an hour on labor or a few bucks here and there -- like last week when I had my 12k service, did a BYOB (Bring Your Own Belt).

But, just like you, I'm attached to the C-Series scoots. The only change I could anticipate might be to figure out a way to test-drive a GT instead of the two Sport models I've owned, to see once and for all if my instinct that it's just more plastic I don't need is indeed true.

Sorry to hear that you found the AK 550 doesn't trip your trigger, because it does indeed have all the modern features I'd have expected BMW to add in to a refreshed model -- had they kept the line going, rather than discontinue it. To me, the Kymco just looks like my Sport, but with all angles, and no curves to its shape and bodywork.

I guess you and I are lucky that we indeed not only want what we have, but also have what we want. :)
 

Delray

Active member
"I envy how hands-on you've been able to get with your GT ... you've turned each nut ... with your own ten digits.

That's a big reason why I love this particular bike. There is such satisfaction in that work. This was kind of an ugly duckling trade-in sitting behind $100,000 Ducati's -- none of which I would buy if I had the cash on hand; I wanted the big BMW scooter with the electronic screen and heated grips and TPMS and storage for weeks. After the work I did, with OEM or comparable parts, the bike sang like Pavarotti. I swear it acted like an abandoned dog in a new home; it felt love and responded.

"NYC apartment living keeps me on the mechanic's leash"

I had a garage until a few months ago when I bought a condo with an assigned parking space. With an oil change coming up, I will miss that garage big-time. At least I can park under a big, shady tree with summer weather all year. As a former northerner, I know winter weather is another challenge you face. Frozen hands and chilly metal is no fun.

"test-drive a GT instead of the two Sport models I've owned, to see ... if it's just more plastic"

IMHO, I've ridden two Sport bikes and would say a GT is definitely NOT just more plastic. The Sports felt like the Kymco, lighter, more nimble and flickable. They fit the name, sporty. The GT is like moving from a mid-sized car (Sport) to a full-sized car (GT). The GT has gravitas. It feels substantial and fits its name, Grand Touring. As they say, YMMV, but I always prefer a bike with creature comforts.

FWIW, if you're ever in South Florida ... West Palm, Boca Raton, Delray Beach ... you can take my GT for a spin if you haven't ridden one.
 
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