Wall Street Journal BMW C650GT review

bicyclenut

Member
This was posted on the Google group, but for those of you not on both, there was a review of the BMW scooter um motorcycle posted today by Dan Neil...
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Lee

New member
Good article! Honestly, if the C650GT wasn't so comfortable for touring, I would have gone the RT route! I really can find nothing lacking on the C650GT for me!
 

TwoPort

Member
Some chromed Harley "10 miles per day riders" snubbed us yesterday so this article helped my wife feel better. I got over the scooter sneers years ago.

(No smack to Harley - its some subset of those who get them)
 

Bornfree

Member
Funny ... out of the tens of thousands of riders who descended onto the little town of Leesburg for the 27th Annual Leesburg Bike Fest, I saw less than a dozen BMW's. Both walking around and riding around convinced me I brought the sole C650GT.
Once upon a time, riding a Harley identified you as a rebel ... one who doesn't follow the pack.
Obviously those days are over. True rebels are riding BMW’s. And the most erudite of these are riding C600's/C650’s ... jus sayin'
On the road to Leesburg.jpg
 
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JaimeC

New member
17 inch tires??? I wonder if the Wall Street Journal would be interested in hiring a motorcycling editor...
 

exavid

Member
I had K1100LT three years ago when I bought my 650GT. Now I have only one bike, the GT. I really liked my LT, great looking, great performance and all that but the GT won out just because it was so handy. In traffic, on the freeway, running errands or longer trips, I just picked the GT for comfort and utility. Finally I had to admit to myself that the LT was being neglected and there was no reason to keep insurance on both bikes. So the LT found a new owner last year. I'm still happy with my GT. Not as good looking as the LT but overall it's the most useful bike I've owned in the nearly sixty years I've owned motorcycles and scooters. Fitting I guess that I started out in 1957 with a scooter (Cushman) and will finish up with a scooter. But what a difference.
 

SteveADV

Active member
17 inch tires??? I wonder if the Wall Street Journal would be interested in hiring a motorcycling editor...

Ha, yeah I saw that. Excellent article though. One of the guys in my office put it on my desk. Nice pictures, too.
 

bicyclenut

Member
Too bad there are just too many closed minded motorcycle riders out there that have big egos and can't imagine something technically classified as a Scooter could be useful and fun. And maybe even better than their "motorcycle" in many ways. Sports cars are great and fast, but not everyone wants to drive one, some people may want a van, pick-up or a large luxury car. Just because someone doesn't drive the same vehicle as you doesn't mean what they drive is inferior, it just suits their needs better. Fortunately there are many motorcycle riders out there that don't care what you ride, just as long as you ride. I know my buddies who all ride motorcycles could care less what I ride as I can have no issues riding with them.

Unfortunately BMW USA posted the article on their Facebook page and apparently some members can't accept that BMW makes a scooter that may be more than that putt-putt scooter they all envision. I don't think anyone is trying to say that the BMW C600 is going to out accelerate or out handle the BMW 1000rr, the article is saying that this scooter is a bit more than the typical scooter. Apparently some motorcycle riders just can't handle this...

https://www.facebook.com/BMWMotorradUSA/?fref=nf&pnref=story
 

Delray

Well-known member
Posting a reply to direct current readers to a fantastic Wall Street Journal article about the GT. It's in the first post.
 

Ceesie76

Active member
Yes nice article and I couldn't agree more. I recognized myself in the 'lane splitting in LA' for which it is narrow enough. What surprised me about that lane splitting is the large number of car/truck/SUV drivers that make a real effort to make room for you, when they see you approach in their rear-view mirror, sitting still, wondering when the queue is going to nudge forward again. Really very considerate, although almost never necessary.
Back to the article, the only thing I find not quite on the mark, for me at least, is that it's still tiring to ride longer distances. I've done a few longer stints, From Venice to San Diego or Palmdale, and by the time I arrived I was ready to stretch my legs and take a long break from the fun.
Also, on the highway my Sport windscreen does not protect me as much from the wind as the article suggests. Perhaps it's because I touch 6 foot 2 but when I really want to take a break from the wind I have to crouch quite low. For the windnoise, on the highway runs I always wear ear plugs.
Sadly, the rave review does not appear to have resulted in a very big sales success for BMW. I can recall having seen another 650 only once in the past 4 years, even in scooter-heavenly-conditions of congested but always comfortably-heated Southern California.
 

Delray

Well-known member
I've ridden a Sport twice, briefly, so I can't speak to its long distance comfort. In my short riding time, I did sense it was way more flickable and fun than the stately GT. I've always been a cruiser-style rider, though, and obviously the GT ("grand touring") is built for that. I'm 6'1" and the OEM windscreen blocks all the wind in its topmost position. I use the electronic control regularly and love the (full time) trunk. I think the seat and seating position are different, with the GT more feet forward. I spend most of my riding time with legs fully extended -- supremely comfortable.

I bought my current 2019 GT six weeks ago in Charleston, South Carolina and rode 555 miles home. The second day I covered 400 miles over 12 hours (lots of stops) and felt physically fine when I turned the key off for the day -- I could have kept going. It was a genuine pleasure. I'm riding from Florida to New York and back this summer and look forward to it.

I wish we had lane splitting in Florida. The best I can do is cruise along the shoulder at stop lights and paddle the bike into the pole position. With the quick pickup, I'm through the intersection before the car behind steps on the gas. Interesting observation about L.A. drivers making room for you. I read an article about riding in Germany recently where lane-splitting is illegal. The Germans are apparently such sticklers for following rules, if they see a bike in the rear view mirror that is lane-splitting, they will actually move their cars into its path to block the bike! I'm 3rd gen German-American on both sides, but that's a dick move.

I also think the article nailed the bikes. From "insane pride of ownership" to feeling smarter riding it (which I feel every time I pass a loud Harley). There was one mistake in describing the tires as 17 inches. Man, I would love 17" tires.
 
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RollaCosta

Active member
Larger tyres would necessitate even higher seat. It is already too high for some, especially when you want a proper wind protection comfort - with high tail (because you're sitting on the rear wheel + the helmet-tall storage box) you need even higher front, this adding weight.
This is why I really consider Tiger Bracy's Victory Vision 800 design the real future - sit low, let storage in front be your windshield. Genius.
Victory are wimps for not having the guts to release it. I hope someone else does, soon...
 
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